Nets: Spencer Dinwiddie Defends Choice to Put ‘Trillion’ on Back of Jersey

Brooklyn Nets star Spencer Dinwiddie has been criticized for his jersey alteration choice.

On Saturday it was reported the NBA would be allowing players to wear a social justice statement on the back of their jerseys in place of their last name. Given what the world is experiencing at the moment, coupled with the resistance from some players to continue on with the season, it’s no surprise why commissioner Adam Silver signed off on this.

For Spencer Dinwiddie, he’s not going with an obvious statement or movement on the back of his uniform. He revealed on Sunday night that he’ll be wearing the word “Trillion” for the remainder of the campaign, and we can’t say it was met with applause.

Well, good luck arguing with the man, because he’s no slouch.

Dinwiddie posted that around 10 p.m. ET on Sunday night and began responding to the criticism further on Monday afternoon after claiming the commentary was bothering him.

Dinwiddie left no stone unturned in his defense and exposed those who were criticizing him in a major way. Why should fans care what players are putting on the back of their jerseys and why do they need an explanation? Don’t worry folks, you will see plenty of “Black Lives Matter”; “George Floyd”; “Breonna Taylor”; and everything that pertains to social justice.

Why not have something in there that’s a bit different and speaks to a larger aspect of the problems we experience on a daily basis? Money. How we spend it. How the global economic system can work to oppress certain people. How we can use our dollars to better our lives and the lives of others. Understanding literally anything beyond the basic concept of cashing a paycheck.

We’re quite literally going through a debt crisis at the moment. Coronavirus has exposed that in a big way. Dinwiddie wanting to bring attention to something that plays a role in systemic racism is nothing to criticize — it’s yet another layer people need to understand and be educated on.

This thread includes 16 tweets that should be read in full. Dinwiddie explains his reasoning thoroughly. We recommend you give it a read.

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